Tag Archives: easy recipe

#ChipotleEggs

1 Jul


Ok, so technically this dish was Chipotle Egg Hash but I could not resist playing on that by hash-tagging it. Get it? I am too easily amused.
This dish intrigued me because
a)Who ever heard of sauteeing hard-boiled eggs?The cookbook-writing love of my life Mark Bittman, that’s who. Crazy!
b)chipotles. spicy. num. all in lower-caps for some reason.
c)Before I became a vegetarian at the age of 12 hash of the corned beef variety was one of the few meat dishes I really dug.

This dish totally rocked. Adding chipotles was a variation on the original recipe, which I am going to give a whirl, as well as a couple of the other variations, methinks. In the meantime, try this because it is easy and awesome.
Chipotle Egg Hash(slightly adapted from How to Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman)
olive oil spray
2 tsp. butter, divided
1 white potato
salt
freshly ground pepper
2 hard-boiled eggs
1 tsp. chopped garlic
2 Tbsp. green onions
1 canned chipotle pepper in adobo sauce, minced
cilantro

Dice potato. Spray a skillet with olive oil and melt 1 teaspoon butter over medium high heat. Add potato, salt and freshly ground pepper and cook about five minutes undisturbed then stir, turn heat to medium and cook until browned, about 10 minutes. Add a splash of water to pan, scrape up any tasty browned bits, transfer all to a plate.
Separate whites and yolks. Mash yolks with the chipotle and chop whites into big chunks. Melt 1 teaspoon butter over medium-high, add whites and cook undisturbed until they are browning and sizzling. Add salt and freshly ground pepper. Stir, add garlic and cook a bit more. Stir in potatoes and green onion and cook a bit more. Lastly stir in yolk mixture. Garnish with cilantro. Don’t forget the cilantro. Unless you are one of those nutjobs who does not care for it. Kidding. You are not a nutjob, but you are missing out.

Look ma, I garnished: Pumpkin week day 3

20 May

Considerably more attractive than yesterday’s shake, eh? I am particularly excited for this Pumpkin Protein Shake, changed only a bit from Meals and Moves, because it is thanks to this blog that I discovered the wonders of xanthum gum. And as soon as I manage to find guar gum I hope to experience more shake magic. One of my complaints about protein shakes is that they either have too little body, or too much ice. How to get a thick, creamy texture without having to add ice? Use one of these gums. It makes your shake like almost like pudding. Liiiiiiike puddin’. So I’ll quit my yammering and give you the recipe I made last night:
Pumpkin Protein Shake(adapted-just barely-from Meals and Moves)
1 cup plain unsweetened almond milk
1 serving vanilla protein powder
1/2 cup pumpkin(from a can)
4 tsp. cinnamon
generous pinches of ginger and nutmeg
small pinch ground cloves
dash of vanilla
1/2 tsp. xanthum gum
sweetener to taste(is used a few packets of Equal-yeah I know its bad for you oh well)
Blend it up. Pour it in a glass and if you’re feeling frou-frou garnish with a dash of cinnamon and a shot of Reddi-whip. Love that stuff.

Patty Cake, Patty…egg?

20 Apr

I still have soy bacon to use up, as well as cheese so I decided to make another recipe from “The Big Book of Breakfast” by Maryana Vollstedt. I must say I’ve had that book for several years and everything I’ve ever made from it has been fantastic, including these Egg Patties. My changes to the recipe were halving the recipe, using egg beaters for a couple of the eggs, swiss cheese instead of parmesan, and soy bacon instead of real. Also, you are supposed to cook the bacon and then crumble it before mixing it in, but with the soy bacon I’ve found pre-cooking it turns it into very un-tasty dried up soy nublets. So I just chopped it up raw. Unlike real bacon you don’t really have to cook it at all and its safe. If you use real bacon though I assume you should cook it first to avoid getting sick from it. But what do I know? I haven’t touched meat in the last 18 years and I was too young to actually cook when I gave it up, so I am, and forever shall be a meat-cooking virgin. And a prolific run-on sentence writer.
Anywho, here’s MY recipe, adapted from Vollstedt’s:
Egg Patties
1 egg whisked with 1/2 cup egg substitute
1 ounce grated swiss cheese
2 chopped green onions
1/2 slice of toasted whole wheat bread, crumbled
1/4 cup chopped parsley
1 slice of soy bacon, chopped
pink fleur de sel to sprinkle on before serving
There was supposed to be pepper to taste but I forgot this and it still turned out great.
Mix it up and cook by heaping tablespoonfuls over medium heat. Sprinkle with the salt. Nummy. Quick. Pretty darned ideal supper. I ate the whole thing-approximately ten little patties.

I vant to be alone. Dahhhling!

16 Apr

That was my sentiment this Friday. It was an exhausting week due to work and social duties and I wanted a night in. Plus I had not made anything new in a while. So! Hot date with myself, my oven and “The Big Book of Breakfast” by Maryana Vollstedt. I love breakfast foods, though definitely not in the morning. The idea of any food, let alone hot, sweet, and heavy food(my, but that sounds pornographic) first thing in the morning turns my tummy. But late at night? Bring it on.
I have hash brown potatoes in my freezer as well as soy bacon in my fridge that needed using so I decided upon the Hash Brown Potato Pie. I had to make a few adjustments: using hash brown patties instead of loose measurable hash browns, egg beaters instead of eggs, swiss cheese instead of monterey jack and of course soy instead of real bacon. So my recipe:
1 cup egg substitute
1/4 cup milk
1/2 teaspoon salt
pepper to taste
3 hash brown patties, thawed and chopped
3 Tbsp. chopped green onion
4 slices of soy bacon, chopped
1/2 cup cheddar
1/2 cup swiss
Mix everything but the swiss, spray a 9 inch pie tin with nonstick spray and pour in. Top with swiss. Cook at 350 for around a half hour.
The results:

I am now off to eat this pan of deliciousness. Well maybe not the whole thing…

Milk. Toast.

31 Mar

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This was the perfect example of how simple is better. Milk toast. From Marion Cunningham’s The Breakfast Book. If you don’t own this book you should correct the errors of your ways. Both the prose and the recipes almost make me want to be a breakfast eater. Almost. Naturally I had milk toast for dinner. She gives variations both for oven and stove-top versions. This time round I did the stove-top version. You toast bread, bring milk to a simmer then take it off the heat, stir in some butter and optional sugar and nutmeg. I opted for some stevia. I also used some smart balance instead of butter. This is poured over toast, covered and allowed to sit for five minutes. Take the cover off and it’s just magical: your toast is about 3 times larger. And soooo delicious. This goes next to oatmeal in the simplicity is perfection category. Now go have some milk toast for breakfast, lunch, brunch, dinner, midnight snack…